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Notes to the consolidated financial statements

Notes to the consolidated financial statements​​​

General information

The Lassila & Tikanoja Group specialises in environmental management and property and plant support services. The Group has business operations in Finland, Sweden and Russia.

The Group's parent company is Lassila & Tikanoja plc. Lassila & Tikanoja plc is a Finnish public limited liability company domiciled in Helsinki. The registered address of the Company is Valimotie 27, 00380 Helsinki.

Lassila & Tikanoja plc is listed on the NASDAQ OMX Helsinki.

The consolidated financial statements are available on the company website at www.lassila-tikanoja.com or from the parent company’s head office, address Valimotie 27, 00380 Helsinki, Finland.

These consolidated financial statements have been approved for issue by the Board of Directors of Lassila & Tikanoja plc on 31 January 2017. Under the Finnish Limited Liability Companies Act, the shareholders may accept or reject the financial statements at the general meeting of shareholders held after their publication. The meeting also has the power to make a decision to amend the financial statements.

Basis of preparation

The consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), with application of the IFRS and IAS standards as well as IFRIC and SIC interpretations in effect on 31 December 2016. In the Finnish Accounting Act and regulations enacted by virtue of it, International Financial Reporting Standards refer to standards and related interpretations approved for adoption within the EU according to the procedure described in regulation (EC) 1606/2002.  The notes to the consolidated financial statements also comply with the Finnish accounting and community legislation supplementing the IFRS regulations.

The financial statements have been prepared under the historical cost convention, with the exception of available-for-sale investments for which a fair value can be determined from market prices, and derivative contracts, which have been measured at fair value. Share-based payments have been recognised at fair value on the grant date. 

Figures in these financial statements are presented in millions of euros. 

The preparation of financial statements in accordance with IFRS requires the management to make certain estimates and decisions based on its discretion. Information on decisions based on management discretion which the management has used in the application of the Group's accounting policies and which have the most material impact on data presented in the financial statements, as well as the key assumptions regarding the future and affecting management judgments is given in section “Critical judgments in applying the Group’s accounting policies”.

Application of new or amended IFRS standards

As of 1 January 2016, the Group has applied the following new and amended standards and interpretations in preparing these consolidated financial statements:

  • Annual Improvements to IFRSs (2012-2014 cycle) (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2016): The annual improvements process provides a mechanism for minor and non-urgent amendments to IFRSs to be grouped together and issued in one package annually. The cycle contains amendments to four standards. Their impacts vary standard by standard but are not significant.
  • Amendment to IAS 1 Presentation of Financial Statements: Disclosure Initiative (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2016). The amendments clarify the guidance in IAS 1 in relation to applying the materiality concept, disaggregating line items in the balance sheet and in the statement of profit or loss, presenting subtotals and to the structure and accounting policies in the financial statement.  The amendments have had no impact on presentation in the consolidated financial statements. 
  • Amendments to IAS 16 Property, Plant and Equipment and IAS 38 Intangible Assets - Clarification of Acceptable Methods of Depreciation and Amortisation (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2016): The amendments state that revenue-based methods of depreciation cannot be used for property, plant and equipment and may only be used in limited circumstances to amortise intangible assets if revenue and the consumption of the economic benefits of the intangible assets are highly correlated. The amendments have had no impact on the consolidated financial statements.
  • Amendments to IAS 16 Property, Plant and Equipment and IAS 41 Agriculture - Bearer Plants (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2016): These amendments allow biological assets that meet the definition of a bearer plant to be measured at cost instead of fair value. However the produce growing on bearer plants will continue to be measured at fair value less costs to sell under IAS 41. These amendments have had no impact on the consolidated financial statements.
  • Amendments to IAS 27 Separate Financial Statements – Equity Method in Separate Financial Statements (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2016): The amendments to IAS 27 will allow entities to use the equity method to account for investments in subsidiaries, joint ventures and associates in their separate financial statements. The amendments will not have an impact on the consolidated financial statements.
  • Amendments to IFRS 10 Consolidated Financial Statements, IFRS 12 Disclosure of Interests in Other Entities and IAS 28 Investments in Associates and Joint Ventures: Investment Entities: Applying the Consolidation Exception* (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2016): The amendments to IFRS 10, IFRS 12 and IAS 28 clarify the requirements for preparing consolidated financial statements when there are investment entities within the group.  The amendments also provide relief for non-investment entities for equity accounting of investment entities. The amendments have had no impact on the consolidated financial statements.
  • Amendments to IFRS 11 Joint Arrangements - Accounting for Acquisitions of Interests in Joint Operations (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2016): The amendments require business combination accounting to be applied to acquisitions of interests in a joint operation that constitutes a business. The amendments have had no impact on the consolidated financial statements.

Accounting policies

Consolidation

Subsidiaries

The consolidated financial statements include the parent company Lassila & Tikanoja plc and all subsidiaries in which the Group exercises control. The criteria for control are fulfilled when the Group is exposed, or has rights, to variable returns from its involvement with an entity and has the ability to affect those returns through its power over the entity.

Intra-Group shareholdings have been eliminated using the acquisition method. Consideration given and the identifiable assets and liabilities of an acquired company are recognised at fair value on the date of acquisition. Any costs associated with the acquisition, with the exception of costs arising from the issuance of debt securities or equity instruments, have been recorded as expenses. Any conditional additional sale price has been measured at fair value on the date of acquisition and classified as a liability or as equity. Additional sale price classified as a liability is measured at fair value on the closing day of each reporting period, and the resulting gains or losses are recognised through profit or loss. Additional sale price classified as equity will not be re-measured. Any non-controlling interests in the acquired entity are recognised either at fair value or at the proportionate share of non-controlling interests in the acquired entity’s net identifiable assets. The principle applied in measurement is specified separately for each acquisition. Tytäryhtiöiden hankinnasta syntyneen liikearvon käsittelyä kuvataan kohdassa ”Goodwill and other intangible assets”.

The subsidiaries are fully consolidated from the date on which control is transferred to the Group until the date that control ceases.

The profit or loss for the period and the comprehensive income are attributed to the parent company’s shareholders and non-controlling interests, even if this would result in the non-controlling interest being negative. Equity attributable to non-controlling interests is presented as a separate item in the statement of financial position, as an equity component. Changes in the parent company’s holdings in the subsidiary and not resulting in loss of controlling interest are presented as equity transactionsThe Group has no material non-controlling interests.

In an acquisition achieved in stages, the previous holdings are measured at fair value and the resulting gains or losses are recognised through profit or loss. If the Group loses its controlling interest in the subsidiary, its remaining holdings are measured at fair value on the date when control ceases, and the difference is recognised through profit or loss.

All intra-Group transactions, receivables, liabilities and unrealised gains, as well as distribution of profits within the Group, are eliminated in the consolidated financial statements. Unrealised losses are not eliminated if the losses are attributable to impairment. The distribution of profit or loss for the period between equity holders of the parent company and the non-controlling interest is presented in a separate income statement and the statement of comprehensive income, and the share of equity belonging to the non-controlling interest is presented as a separate item in the consolidated statement of financial position under equity. 

Associates

Associates are companies over which the Group has significant influence. The Group has significant influence when it holds more than 20% of the voting rights or otherwise has significant influence but a non-controlling interest. The equity method has been used in the consolidation of associates.​

Foreign currency translation

Figures indicating the performance and financial position of the Group entities are specified in the currency of the economic operating environment in which the entity primarily operates (functional currency). The consolidated financial statements are presented in euros, which is the parent company's functional and presentation currency.

Any transactions in foreign currencies have been recognised in the functional currency using the exchange rate in effect on the transaction date. In practice, it is customary to use a rate that is close enough to the transaction day rate. Monetary assets denominated in foreign currency are translated into euros using the exchange rates in effect on the balance sheet date. Non-monetary assets are translated using the exchange rate in effect on the transaction date. L&T has no non-monetary assets denominated in foreign currency that are measured at fair value. Exchange rate gains and losses arising from foreign-currency transactions and the translation of monetary items are recognised in the income statement. Foreign exchange gains and losses on business transactions are included in the respective items above operating profit. Foreign exchange gains and losses on financial assets and liabilities are included in financial income and costs. 

The income statements of the Group entities whose functional currency is not the euro are translated into euros at average exchange rates for the period, and the statements of financial position at the exchange rates in effect on the balance sheet date. The difference in exchange rates applicable to the translation of profit in the income statement and statement of comprehensive income result in a translation difference recognised in the translation reserve within equity. Translation differences arising from the elimination of the acquisition cost of foreign subsidiaries, as well as translation differences in equity items accumulating after the acquisition, are recognised in the translation difference reserve.

Goodwill and fair value adjustments to the carrying amounts of the assets and liabilities arising on the acquisition of a foreign entity are treated as assets and liabilities of the foreign entity and translated into euros at the closing rate.

Goodwill and other intangible assets

Goodwill represents the portion of the acquisition cost by which the aggregate of the consideration given, the share of non-controlling owners in the acquired entity and the previously owned share exceed the fair value of the acquired entities at the time of acquisition. Goodwill is not amortised, but is tested annually for impairment. Goodwill is presented in the statement of financial position at original cost less impairment losses, if any. 

Intangible assets acquired in a business combination are measured at fair value. The useful lives of intangible assets are estimated to be either finite or indefinite. In L&T, the intangible assets recognised in business combinations include items such as customer relations, non-competition agreements and environmental permits. They have finite useful lives, varying between three and thirteen years.

Other intangible assets consist primarily of software and software licences. 

The costs of software projects are recognised in other intangible assets starting from the time when the projects move out of the research phase into the development phase and the outcome of a project is an identifiable intangible asset. Such an intangible asset must provide L&T with future economic benefit that exceeds the costs of its development. The cost comprises all directly attributable costs necessary for preparing the asset to be capable of operating in the manner intended by the management. The largest cost items are consultancy fees paid to third parties, as well as salaries and other expenses for the Group’s personnel.  

The depreciation period for computer software and software licences is five years.

Depreciation will cease when an intangible asset is classified as held for sale (or included in a disposal group held for sale) in accordance with IFRS 5 Non-current Assets Held for Sale and Discontinued Operations.

Property, plant and equipment

Property, plant and equipment are recognised at acquisition cost less accumulated depreciation and impairment losses. The historical cost includes expenditure that is directly attributable to the acquisition of property, plant and equipment. Borrowing costs immediately arising from the acquisition, construction or manufacture of property, plant and equipment that meet the conditions are capitalised as part of the asset’s acquisition cost.

In business combinations, property, plant and equipment are measured at fair value on the acquisition date. In the statement of financial position, property, plant and equipment are shown less accumulated depreciation and impairment, if any.

Property, plant and equipment are depreciated using the straight-line method over their expected useful lives, excluding new landfills. The expected useful lives are reviewed on each balance sheet date, and, if expectations differ materially from previous estimates, the depreciation periods are adjusted to reflect the changes in expectations of future economic benefits.

Depreciation in the financial statements is based on the following expected useful lives:

​Buildings and structures 5–30 years​
Vehicles   ​ ​6–15 years
Machinery and equipment ​ ​4–15 years

 

For completed landfills the Group applies the units of production method, which involves depreciation on the basis of the volume of waste received. Land is not depreciated. 

When an asset included in property, plant and equipment consists of several components with different estimated useful lives, each component is treated as a separate asset. Ordinary repair and maintenance costs are recognised in the income statement during the period in which they are incurred. Costs of significant modification and improvement projects are capitalised if it is probable that the projects will result in future economic benefits to the Group. When a tangible asset is classified as held for sales in accordance with IFRS 5 Noncurrent Assets Held for Sale and Discontinued Operations, depreciation will no longer be recorded. Gains and losses on sales and disposal of property, plant and equipment are recognised through profit or loss and are presented in other operating income or expenses.

Impairment of tangible and intangible assets

On each closing day of a reporting period, the Group assesses the balance sheet values of its assets for any impairment. If any indication exists, an estimate of the asset’s recoverable amount is made. The need for recognition of impairment is assessed at the level of cash generating units – that is, the lowest level of unit that is primarily independent of other units and that generates cash flows that are separately identifiable.

The recoverable amount is the higher of an asset’s fair value less selling costs and its value in use. Value in use refers to the estimated future net cash flows available from an asset or cash-generating unit, discounted to the present value. The discount rate used is the pre-tax rate, which reflects the market view of the time value of money and the risks associated with the asset.

An impairment loss is recognised in the income statement when an asset’s carrying amount exceeds its recoverable amount. Impairment losses attributable to a cash-generating unit are used for deducting first the goodwill allocated to the cash-generating unit and, thereafter, the other assets of the unit on an equal basis.

An impairment loss for an asset other than goodwill recognised in prior periods is reversed if there is a change in circumstances and the recoverable amount has changed. An impairment loss recognised for goodwill is not reversed.

Goodwill is tested for impairment annually or whenever there is any indication of impairment. Recoverable amount calculations based both on values in use and on the net sales price are made for the cash-generating units to which the goodwill has been allocated.

Intangible assets under construction are software projects that cannot be tested separately for impairment, as they do not generate separate cash flow. There is no need for impairment if, at the end of the financial period, it is clear that the projects will be completed and the software will be introduced. Intangible assets under construction are, however, tested for impairment as part of the cash generating unit to which they belong.​

Leases

The Group as a lessee

Assets leased under a finance lease are recognised in property, plant and equipment at amounts equal to the fair value of the leased property or, if lower, the present value of the minimum lease payments. They are depreciated over the term of the lease or over their expected useful lives, if shorter. However, when there is reasonable assurance that the ownership of the leased asset will transfer to L&T by the end of the lease term, the asset will be depreciated using the method applied for a corresponding asset owned by the company. Liabilities arising from the leases are recorded under loans. Each lease payment is apportioned between financial cost and loan repayment. Financial costs are allocated to each period of the leasing term so as to produce a constant periodic rate of interest on the remaining balance of the liability.  

The Group as a lessor

The Environmental Services division leases out equipment, such as waste compactors, to customers under long-term leases that transfer the material risks and rewards associated with ownership to the lessee. Such leases are classified as finance leases, and net investment in them is recognised as a trade receivable upon commencement of the lease term. Each lease payment is apportioned between financial income and repayment of trade receivables. Financial income is allocated over the lease term on the basis of a pattern that reflects a constant periodic rate of return on the net investment.

Leases of assets and premises that do not transfer the material risks and rewards associated with ownership to the lessee are classified as operating leases. The lease payments are recognised on a straight-line basis over the term of the lease as income or cost, depending on whether L&T is the lessor or the lessee. Assets leased out under operating leases are recognised in property, plant and equipment and are depreciated over their expected useful lives using the method applied for corresponding property, plant and equipment owned by the company.

Non-current assets held for sale and discontinued operations

Non-current assets (or disposal groups) and assets and liabilities associated with discontinued operations are classified as held for sale if the amount corresponding to their carrying amount will be principally recovered through their sale instead of continued use. An asset is considered to meet the conditions specified for an asset to be classified as held for sale when the asset (or disposal group) is immediately available for sale in its present condition under standard and conventional terms, when management is committed to a plan to sell, and the sale is expected within one year of the classification. 

Immediately before the initial classification of the asset or disposal group as held for sale, the assets and liabilities will be measured in accordance with applicable IFRSs. After classification as held for sale, non-current assets (or disposal groups) are measured at the lower of the carrying amount and fair value, less selling costs. Depreciation of these assets will be discontinued upon classification. If the asset does not meet the classification conditions, the classification is cancelled and the asset is measured at pre-classification balance sheet value less depreciation and impairment, or the recoverable amount, whichever is lower. Non-current assets, or the assets and liabilities of a disposal group, classified as held for sale must be presented separately in the statement of financial position. Similarly, any liabilities of disposal groups must be presented separately from other liabilities. The profit or loss of discontinued operations must be presented in a separate line in the income statement. Comparison data shown in the income statement is adjusted for operations classified as discontinued during the most recent financial period presented. The profit or loss of discontinued operations must be shown in a separate line, including comparison data. There were no discontinued operations in the financial periods 2015 and 2014.

Inventories

Inventories are measured at the lower of cost and net realisable value. Net realisable value is the estimated selling price in the ordinary course of business, less the estimated costs of completion and selling expenses. The inventories of L&T Biowatti and Environmental Products are measured using the weighted average cost method. The value of other inventories is determined using the FIFO method. 

At its recycling plants, L&T processes recyclable materials into secondary raw materials for sale. The cost of the inventories of these materials comprises raw materials, direct labour costs, other direct costs of manufacturing and a proportion of variable and fixed production overheads based on normal operating capacity. 

Financial assets and liabilities

Financial assets and liabilities are classified as loans and receivables, available-for-sale investments, financial assets and liabilities at fair value through profit or loss, and as other financial liabilities. This classification is performed when the asset or liability is acquired and is based on the purpose of the acquisition.  

A financial asset is derecognised when the rights to the cash flows from the asset expire, or when all material risks and rewards of the ownership of the asset have been transferred outside L&T.

Borrowings and other receivables are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market. They are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method. Trade and other receivables are included in this category and are recognised in the statement of financial position at historical cost less credit adjustments and impairment losses. 

Available-for-sale investments include rahasto-osuuksia as well as certificates of deposit and commercial papers. By definition, the category includes financial assets that do not belong to actual business and are not in production use on the one hand, and financial assets that can be sold to obtain working capital for business operations on the other hand. 

In the financial statements, available-for-sale investments, except for equity investments, are measured at fair value at the market prices in effect on the balance sheet date. Changes in fair values are recognised under other comprehensive income and presented, considering tax effects, in the revaluation reserve within equity. Accumulated changes in fair values are recognised as reclassification adjustments resulting from recognition through profit or loss instead of equity when the investment is sold, matures, or when its fair value has been impaired to the extent that an impairment loss must be recognised. All unlisted shares are measured at cost or at cost less impairment loss, if any. The markets for these shares are inactive and their fair value cannot be measured reliably. An impairment loss is recognised when the fair value of the investment is materially or extendedly lower than its acquisition cost.

Available-for-sale investments are included in non-current assets, if management intends not to dispose of the investments within 12 months of the balance sheet date. All purchases and sales of available-for-sale investments are recognised on the settlement date.

Financial assets and liabilities at fair value through profit or loss are derivative financial instruments to which hedge accounting is not applied. Accounting policies applied to them are described below under Derivative financial instruments and hedge accounting.

Borrowings are recognised in the statement of financial position on the settlement date at fair value, on the basis of the consideration received, including transaction costs directly attributable to the acquisition or issue. These financial liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest rate method. 

Trade and other current non-interest-bearing payables are recognised in the statement of financial position at cost. 

Derivative instruments and hedge accounting 

As specified in its financial policy, L&T uses derivative instruments to reduce the financing risks associated with interest rate and commodity rate fluctuations. L&T’s derivative instruments include interest rate swaps to hedge the cash flow of variable-rate borrowings against interest rate risk, commodity swaps made to balance price fluctuations in future diesel purchases, and currency forward contracts made to hedge purchases in foreign currencies against foreign exchange risk.

Derivatives are recognised initially in the statement of financial position at fair value. After acquisition, they are measured at fair value on each balance sheet date. The fair values are based on market quotations on the balance sheet date. Any gains and losses arising from measurement at fair value are accounted for in the manner determined by the purpose of the derivative instrument.

All interest rate, commodity and currency hedges meet the criteria set for efficient hedging in the Group’s risk management policy. The profits and losses from derivatives covered by hedge accounting are recorded consistently with the underlying commodity. Derivative agreements are defined as hedging instruments for future cash flows and anticipated purchases (cash flow hedging), or as derivative agreements to which hedge accounting is not applied (financial hedging).

L&T applies cash-flow hedge accounting to all interest rate and currency swaps and commodity derivatives. When hedge accounting is initiated, L&T documents the relationship between the hedged item and the hedging instrument, as well as the Group's risk management objectives and hedging strategy. The Group does not use derivatives to hedge net investments made in independent foreign units.

When hedging begins and in connection with each interim report, L&T documents and estimates the effectiveness of the hedging relationships by assessing the hedging instrument’s ability to cancel any changes in the cash flows of the hedged item.

To the extent that cash flow hedging is efficient, changes in fair values of hedging instruments are recognised in the hedging reserve within equity. When a hedging instrument expires or is sold, or when a hedge no longer meets the criteria for hedge accounting under IAS 39, the gain or loss on the hedging instrument remains in equity until the hedged cash flow materialises. If the hedged cash flow is no longer expected to materialise, the gain or loss incurred on the hedging instrument is recognised in the income statement immediately. The ineffective portion of hedging relationship is also recognised immediately in the income statement.

Hedge accounting in accordance with IAS 39 was not applied to foreign currency forward instruments and changes in the fair values of these items were recognised in the income statement as financial income or costs. Derivatives to which hedge accounting is not applied are categorised as financial assets and liabilities held for trading. 

The positive fair values of all derivatives are recorded in the statement of financial position under derivative receivables. Similarly, the negative fair values of derivatives are recorded under derivative payables. All fair values of derivatives are included in current assets or liabilities. 

Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents consist of cash on hand, bank deposits redeemable on demand and other short-term liquid investments. Their maturity is no longer than three months from the acquisition date. They are recognised as of the settlement date and measured at historical cost. Foreign currency transactions are translated into euros using the exchange rates prevailing on the balance sheet date.

Impairment of financial assets 

The Group assesses on each balance sheet date whether there is objective evidence that any financial asset item is impaired. If there is evidence of impairment, the cumulative loss in the fair value reserve is recognised in profit or loss. Impairment losses on shares classified as financial assets available for sale are not reversed through profit or loss, as is the case with impairment losses recognised on fixed income instruments that are subsequently reversed.

Doubtful debts are reviewed each month. If there is objective evidence that the balance sheet values of the receivables exceed their recoverable amounts, the difference is recognised as an impairment loss in other operating expenses in the income statement. The criteria for recognising an impairment loss on a receivable include the debtor’s substantial financial difficulties, corporate restructuring, a credit loss recommendation issued by a collection agency or extended default on payments. If the difference between the balance sheet value of receivables and the recoverable amounts is reduced later, the impairment loss shall be reversed through profit or loss.   

Borrowing costs

Borrowing costs are recognised as expenses in the period in which they arise.

Borrowing costs that are directly attributable to the acquisition, construction or production of a qualifying asset shall be included in the acquisition cost of that asset. 

Transaction costs directly attributable to borrowing have been included in the historical cost of the liability and recognised as an interest expense during the expected life of the liability applying the effective interest method.

Equity

Ordinary shares are presented as share capital. Any expenses arising from the issue or acquisition of treasury shares are presented as a valuation allowance within equity. If the Group repurchases any equity instruments, the acquisition cost of such instruments is deducted from equity.

Provisions

A provision is recognised when the Group has a legal or factual obligation towards a third party resulting from an earlier event, fulfilment of the payment obligation is probable, and its amount can be reliably estimated. Provisions are measured at the current value of the expenditure required to settle the obligation. Increase in provisions due to the passage of time is recognised as interest expense. Changes in provisions are recognised in the income statement in the same item in which the provision is originally recognised. A provision is recognised if the exact amount or timing of the event is not known. Otherwise the item is recognised in accrued liabilities. The amounts of provisions are estimated on each closing date and adjusted according to the best estimate at the time of the assessment. 

Environmental provisions are recognised when the Group has an existing obligation that is likely to result in a payment obligation, the amount of which can be reliably estimated. Environmental provisions related to the restoration of sites are made at the commencement of each project. The costs recognised as a provision, as well as the original acquisition cost of assets, are depreciated over the useful life of the asset, and provisions are discounted to present value. The most significant provisions recognised in the statement of financial position are the site restoration provisions for landfills and the contaminated soil processing site.

Revenue recognition

Sales of services are recognised after the services have been provided. At plants producing materials for sale, the cost of materials is recognised in inventories. When the processed materials have no sales price, cost provisions are recognised in accrued expenses.

Revenue on goods sold is recognised after the material risks and rewards associated with the ownership of the goods have been transferred to the buyer, and the amount of the revenue can be reliably measured.

For the calculation of net sales, sales revenue is adjusted with indirect taxes and discounts.

Interest income is recognised using the effective interest method. The Group’s dividend income is minor and is recognised when the right becomes vested, if information on dividends is available at that time. Otherwise it is recognised on the date of payment.

Gross profit

Gross profit is the net sum of net sales less the cost of goods sold.

Operating profit

Operating profit is the net sum of gross profit plus other operating income less the costs of sales, marketing, administration and business, depreciation and possible impairment of intangible and tangible assets.

Long-term projects

Contract revenue and contract costs are recognised on the basis of the stage of completion, once the outcome of the project can be estimated reliably. Landfill closure contracts are recognised using the percentage-of-completion method. Their initiation and completion generally take place in different financial periods. The stage of completion of a contract is determined as the proportion of costs incurred from work completed up to the time of review in relation to the estimated total contract costs. If the incurred costs and recognised profits exceed the project billings, the difference is presented in the statement of financial position under trade and other receivables. If the incurred costs and recognised profits are less than the project billings, the difference is presented under advances received. 

When the outcome of a construction contract cannot be estimated reliably, the costs incurred are recognised as an expense for the period in which they are incurred, and revenue is recognised only up to the amount of recoverable contract costs incurred. If it is probable that the total contract costs will exceed total contract revenue, the expected loss is recognised as expense immediately.

The outcome of the projects related to the collection of contaminated soil cannot be estimated reliably. In these projects, revenue is recognised to the amount of costs incurred.

Research and development

Research expenditure is recognised as an expense during the period in which it is incurred. The gains from new service concepts can only be verified at such a late stage that the revenue recognition criteria are not considered fulfilled before the service delivery. Computer software development costs recognised as an asset in the statement of financial position are described in more detail in the following chapter.

Government grants

Government grants or other grants relating to actual costs are recognised in the income statement when the group complies with the conditions attached to them and there is reasonable assurance that the grants will be received. They are presented in other operating income. Government grants directly associated with the recruitment of personnel, such as employment grants, apprenticeship grants and the like, are recognised as reductions in personnel expenses. 

Grants for acquisition of property, plant and equipment are recognised as deductions of historical cost. The grant is recognised as revenue over the economic life of a depreciable asset, by way of a reduced depreciation charge.

Employee benefits

Pension benefit obligations

Pension plans are categorised as defined benefit and defined contribution plans. Under defined contribution plans, the Group pays fixed contributions for pensions, and it has no legal or factual obligation to pay further contributions. All pension arrangements that do not fulfil these conditions are considered defined benefit plans. Contributions to defined contribution plans are recognised in the income statement in the financial period to which they relate. L&T operates pension schemes in accordance with local regulations and practices in the countries in which it operates, and these are mainly defined contribution plans. 

L&T operates some minor defined benefit plans originating mainly from business acquisitions. The Group is responsible for some of these defined benefit pension plans, while others are covered by pension insurance. The obligations have been calculated for each plan separately, using the projected unit credit method. Pension costs are recognised in the income statement over employees’ periods of service, in accordance with actuarial calculations. When calculating the present value of pension obligations, the discount rate is based on the market yield of the high-quality bonds issued by the company, whose maturity materially corresponds to the estimated maturity of the pension obligation. The risk premium is based on bonds issued by companies with an AAA credit rating. The pension plan assets measured at fair value on the balance sheet date are deducted from the present value of the pension obligation to be recognised in the balance sheet. The net liabilities (or assets) associated with a defined benefit pension plan are recorded in the balance sheet.

Items (such as actuarial gains and losses and return on funded defined benefit plan assets, except items related to net interest) arising from the redefinition of the net liabilities (or assets) associated with a defined benefit plan are recognised in other comprehensive income in the period in which they arise.

Past service costs are recognised as expenses through profit or loss at the earlier of the following:  when the plan is rearranged or downsized, or a when the entity recognises the related rearrangement expenses or benefits related to the termination of employment. 

Share-based payment 

The Group has several incentive arrangements for which payments are made either as equity instruments or cash. The benefits granted under the arrangements are measured at fair value on the granting date and recognised as expense evenly over the vesting period. The effect of the arrangement on profit and loss is recognised under employee benefit expenses.

Non-recurring items

Non-recurring items refer to one-off income or expenses arising in the context of a single or infrequent event. The Group records as non-recurring items the profit and loss arising from the divestment or discontinuation of business operations or assets, profit and loss arising from business reorganisation, and goodwill and asset impairment losses. The matching principle is applied in the recognition of non-recurring items in the income statement in a specific income or expense group. Non-recurring items are discussed in more detail in the Report of the Board of Directors.

Income taxes

The Group’s income taxes consist of current tax and deferred tax. Tax expenses are recognised in the income statement, with the exception of items directly recognised in equity or comprehensive result, in which case the tax effect is recognised corresponding item. Current tax is determined for the taxable profit for the period according to prevailing tax rates in each country. Taxes are adjusted by current tax rates for previous periods, if any.

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognised for all temporary differences between the tax bases of assets and liabilities and their carrying amounts. Calculation of deferred taxes is based on the tax rates in effect on the closing day. If the rates change, it is based on the new tax rate. No deferred tax is recognised for impairment of goodwill that is not tax-deductible. A deferred tax asset is recognised only to the extent that it is probable that taxable profit will be available against which the deferred tax asset can be utilised.

Temporary differences arise e.g. from goodwill amortisation performed under FAS; depreciation on property, plant and equipment; revaluation of derivative instruments and measurement at fair value in business combinations. 

Distribution of dividend

The dividend liability to the company’s shareholders is recognised as a liability in the consolidated financial statements, after the Annual General Meeting has decided on the dividend distribution.

Critical judgments in applying the Group’s accounting policies and key uncertainties related to estimates

In drawing up IFRS financial statements, the Group management must make estimates and assumptions concerning the future, the outcome of which may differ from the estimates and assumptions made. The management also employs judgement when making decisions on the selection and application of accounting principles.

The preparation of financial statements requires the management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the carrying amounts on the balance sheet date for assets and liabilities and the amounts of revenues and expenses. The estimates and assumptions reflect the management’s best understanding on the closing date, based on previous experience and assumptions about the future that are considered to have the highest probability on the closing date.

Key assumptions regarding the future and key uncertainty factors related to estimates on the closing date that involve a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of the Group’s assets and liabilities within the next financial year are described below:

Fair value measurement of assets and liabilities acquired in business combinations

Assets and liabilities acquired in business combinations are measured at fair value according to IFRS 3. Whenever possible, the management uses available market values when determining the fair values. When this is not possible, the measurement is based on the historical revenues from the asset. In particular, the measurement of intangible assets is based on discounted cash flows and requires the management to make estimates on future cash flows. Although these estimates are based on the management’s best knowledge, actual results may differ from the estimates (Note 2 Business acquisitions). The carrying amounts of assets are reviewed continuously for impairment. More information on this is provided in the section “Impairment of assets” under the accounting policies.

Goodwill impairment testing

In testing of goodwill for impairment, the recoverable amounts of the cash-generating units to which the goodwill is allocated are determined on the basis of value-in-use calculations. These calculations require management judgements. Though the assumptions used are appropriate according to the management’s judgement, the estimated cash flows may differ fundamentally from those realised in the future. More information on the sensitivity of recoverable amounts is provided in the notes to the financial statements (Note 13 Goodwill impairment tests).


New or amended IFRS standards and interpretations to be applied in future financial periods

The Group has not yet applied the following new or revised standards and interpretations published by IASB. The Group will adopt them as of their effective date or, if the effective date is not the first day of the financial year, as of the beginning of the financial period following the effective date.

*= The provisions had not been approved for application in the EU by 31 December 2016.

  • IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers (applies to financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2018): IFRS 15 lays down a comprehensive framework for determining when revenue can be recognised and to what extent. IFRS 15 replaces the existing guidance on revenue recognition. In accordance with IFRS 15, an entity shall recognise revenue as a monetary amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for the goods or services in question. 
​Lassila & Tikanoja will apply the standard as of 1 January 2018. The company has not yet decided on the transition method to be applied.

Lassila & Tikanoja’s net sales are comprised of the following income flows:

  • The Environmental Services activities are comprised of waste management and recycling businesses and environmental product and environmental management services.
  • The Industrial Services division is comprised of material reuse solutions focusing on material flows generated in industrial processes and their reuse, process cleaning specialising in the cleaning of industrial processes, collection and processing of hazardous waste and sewer maintenance and imaging services specialising in the maintenance of sewer networks.
  • The Facility Services division provides cleaning and support, property maintenance and maintenance of technical system services and damage repair services.
  • The Renewable Energy Sources division (L&T Biowatti) includes wood-based and recycled fuels and forest services.

The company has analysed the customer contracts by division/income flow. Provision ofservicesaccounts for a significant share of the company’s income flows. Currently, services are recognised as revenue as they are provided. The company has preliminarily estimated that control concerning a service is passed over time, as the customer simultaneously receives and consumes the benefit from the company’s performance as the entity performs. Thus, the company satisfies the performance obligation and recognises revenue over time in accordance with the new standard. Therefore, according to current estimates, there will not be any substantial changes to the existing revenue recognition practices.

Customer accounts and contracts in which the timing of revenue recognition and, for example, the calculation method of variable consideration can change have also been identified in connection with the review of contracts. The changes are mainly related to the timing and amount of recognition of revenue from projects and environmental construction. The combined share of the project business and environmental construction of the group’s net sales is under 10%. The review of contracts will continue during the first half of the 2017 financial year.

Furthermore, IFRS 15 requires more detailed notes. The company will prepare the processes for collecting such notes during the 2017 financial year.

  • Amendments to IFRS 15 - Clarifications to IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers* (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2018). The amendments include clarifications and further examples on how to apply certain aspects of the five-step recognition model. The impact assessment of the clarifications has been included in the IFRS 15 impact assessment described above.  
  • IFRS 9 Financial Instruments* (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2018): IFRS 9 replaces the existing guidance in IAS 39.  The new standard includes revised guidance on the classification and measurement of financial instruments, including a new expected credit loss model for calculating impairment on financial assets, and the new general hedge accounting requirements. It also carries forward the guidance on recognition and derecognition of financial instruments from IAS 39. The impacts of IFRS 9 on the consolidated financial statements have been assessed and the expect impacts are minor.
  • IFRS 16 Leases* (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2019): The new standard replaces the current IAS 17 –standard and related interpretations. IFRS 16 requires the lessees to recognise the lease agreements on the balance sheet as a right-of-use assets and lease liabilities. The accounting model is similar to current finance lease accounting according to IAS 17. There are two exceptions available, these relate to either short term contacts in which the lease term is 12 months or less, or to low value items i.e. assets of value USD 5 000 or less. The lessor accounting remains mostly similar to current IAS 17 accounting. The preliminary impact assessment of the standard has been started in the group. 
  • Amendments to IAS 7 Statement of Cash Flows- Disclosure Initiative* (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2017). The changes were made to enable users of financial statements to evaluate changes in liabilities arising from financing activities, including both changes arising from cash flow and non-cash changes. The amendments have an impact on the disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. 
  • Amendments to IAS 12 Income Taxes - Recognition of Deferred Tax Assets for Unrealised Losses *(effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2017). The amendments clarify that the existence of a deductible temporary difference depends solely on a comparison of the carrying amount of an asset and its tax base at the end of the reporting period, and is not affected by possible future changes in the carrying amount or expected manner of recovery of the asset. The amendments have no impact on the consolidated financial statements. 
  • Amendments to IFRS 2 Sharebased payments - Clarification and Measurement of Sharebased Payment Transactions * (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2018). The amendments clarify the accounting for certain types of arrangements. Three accounting areas are covered: measurement of cash-settled share-based payments; classification of share-based payments settled net of tax withholdings; and accounting for a modification of a share-based payment from cash-settled to equity-settled. The amendments have no impact on the consolidated financial statements.
  • Amendments to IFRS 4 Insurance Contracts - Applying IFRS 9 Financial Instruments with IFRS 4 Insurance Contracts* (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2018). The amendments respond to industry concerns about the impact of differing effective dates by allowing two optional solutions to alleviate temporary accounting mismatches and volatility.  The amendments have no impact on the consolidated financial statements. 
  • Amendments to IFRS 10 Consolidated Financial Statements and IAS 28 Investments in Associates and Joint Ventures – Sale or Contribution of Assets between an Investor and its Associate or Join Venture * (the effective date has been postponed indefinitely). The amendments address to clarify the requirements in dealing with the sale or contribution of assets between an investor and its associate or joint venture. The amendments have no impact on the consolidated financial statements.
  • IFRIC 22 Interpretation Foreign Currency Transactions and Advance Consideration* (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2018). When foreign currency consideration is paid or received in advance of the item it relates to – which may be an asset, an expense or income – IAS 21 The Effects of Changes in Foreign Exchange Rates is not clear on how to determine the transaction date for translating the related item. The interpretation clarifies that the transaction date is the date on which the company initially recognises the prepayment or deferred income arising from the advance consideration. For transactions involving multiple payments or receipts, each payment or receipt gives rise to a separate transaction date. The interpretation has no impact on the consolidated financial statements. 
  • Amendments to IAS 40 Investment Property - Transfers of Investment Property* (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2018).  When making transfers of an investment property, the amendments clarify that a change in management’s intentions, in isolation, provides no evidence of a change in use. The examples of evidences of a change in use are also amended so that they refer to property under construction or development as well as to completed property. The amendments have no impact on the consolidated financial statements.
  • Annual Improvements to IFRSs (2014-2016 cycle)* (effective for financial years beginning on or after 1 January 2017 for IFRS 12 and on or after 1 January 2018 for IFRS 1 and IAS 28). The annual improvements process provides a mechanism for minor and non-urgent amendments to IFRSs to be grouped together and issued in one package annually. The cycle contains amendments to three standards. Their impacts vary standard by standard but are not significant.


Lassila & Tikanoja plc

  • Valimotie 27
    P.O. Box 28
    FIN-00380 Helsinki

 

  • Telephone +358 10 636 111
    Fax +358 10 636 2800
    Business ID 1680140-0